Friday, December 31, 2010

CRN Community: How Do I...? Info for starting your VAR business: How To Sell Records Management In 3 Easy Steps

I like to post simple "nitty gritty" articles and this one falls in that category!


CRN Community: How Do I...? Info for starting your VAR business: How To Sell Records Management In 3 Easy Steps

Template for an Electronic Records Management Program | ERM Wiki

This is a good tool! Well worth the time investment and revisiting! Kudos!


Template for an Electronic Records Management Program | ERM Wiki

Friday, December 24, 2010

Records Control Schedules

Very important link!

Records Control Schedules

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations:

Important Guidance for Federal Record Keeping

Subpart A—Identifying Federal Records

§ 1222.1 What are the authorities for Part 1222?
§ 1222.2 What definitions apply to this part?
§ 1222.3 What standards are used as guidance for this part?
§ 1222.10 How should agencies apply the statutory definition of Federal records?
§ 1222.12 What types of documentary materials are Federal records?
§ 1222.14 What are nonrecord materials?
§ 1222.16 How are nonrecord materials managed?
§ 1222.18 Under what conditions may nonrecord materials be removed from Government agencies?
§ 1222.20 How are personal files defined and managed?

Subpart B—Agency Recordkeeping Requirements

§ 1222.22 What records are required to provide for adequate documentation of agency business?
§ 1222.24 How do agencies establish recordkeeping requirements?
§ 1222.26 What are the general recordkeeping requirements for agency programs?
§ 1222.28 What are the series level recordkeeping requirements?
§ 1222.30 When must agencies comply with the recordkeeping requirements of other agencies?
§ 1222.32 How do agencies manage records created or received by contractors?
§ 1222.34 How must agencies maintain records?

Authority: 44 U.S.C. 2904, 3101, 3102, and 3301.

Source: 74 FR 51014, Oct. 2, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—Identifying Federal Records

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§ 1222.1 What are the authorities for Part 1222?

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The statutory authorities for this part are 44 U.S.C. 2904, 3101, 3102, and 3301.

§ 1222.2 What definitions apply to this part?

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See §1220.18 of this subchapter for definitions of terms used in part 1222.

§ 1222.3 What standards are used as guidance for this part?

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These regulations conform with guidance provided in ISO 15489–1:2001, Information and documentation—Records management. Paragraphs 7.1 (Principles of records management programmes), 7.2 (Characteristics of a record), 8.3.5 (Conversion and migration), 8.3.6 (Access, retrieval and use), and 9.6 (Storage and handling) apply to records creation and maintenance.

§ 1222.10 How should agencies apply the statutory definition of Federal records?

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(a) The statutory definition of Federal records is contained in 44 U.S.C. 3301 and provided in §1220.18 of this subchapter.

(b) Several key terms, phrases, and concepts in the statutory definition of a Federal record are further explained as follows:

(1) Documentary materials has the meaning provided in §1220.18 of this subchapter.

(2) Regardless of physical form or characteristics means that the medium may be paper, film, disk, or other physical type or form; and that the method of recording may be manual, mechanical, photographic, electronic, or any other combination of these or other technologies.

(3) Made means the act of creating and recording information by agency personnel in the course of their official duties, regardless of the method(s) or the medium involved.

(4) Received means the acceptance or collection of documentary materials by or on behalf of an agency or agency personnel in the course of their official duties regardless of their origin (for example, other units of their agency, private citizens, public officials, other agencies, contractors, Government grantees) and regardless of how transmitted (in person or by messenger, mail, electronic means, or by any other method). In this context, the term does not refer to misdirected materials. It may or may not refer to loaned or seized materials depending on the conditions under which such materials came into agency custody or were used by the agency. Advice of legal counsel should be sought regarding the “record” status of loaned or seized materials.

(5) Preserved means the filing, storing, or any other method of systematically maintaining documentary materials in any medium by the agency. This term covers materials not only actually filed or otherwise systematically maintained but also those temporarily removed from existing filing systems.

(6) Appropriate for preservation means documentary materials made or received which, in the judgment of the agency, should be filed, stored, or otherwise systematically maintained by an agency because of the evidence of agency activities or information they contain, even if the materials are not covered by its current filing or maintenance procedures.

§ 1222.12 What types of documentary materials are Federal records?

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(a) General. To ensure that complete and accurate records are made and retained in the Federal Government, agencies must distinguish between records and nonrecord materials by applying the definition of records (see 44 U.S.C. 3301 and 36 CFR 1220.18 and 1222.10 of this subchapter) to agency documentary materials in all formats and media.

(b) Record status. Documentary materials are records when they meet the conditions specified in §1222.10(b).

(c) Working files and similar materials. Working files, such as preliminary drafts and rough notes, and other similar materials, are records that must be maintained to ensure adequate and proper documentation if:

(1) They were circulated or made available to employees, other than the creator, for official purposes such as approval, comment, action, recommendation, follow-up, or to communicate with agency staff about agency business; and

(2) They contain unique information, such as substantive annotations or comments that adds to a proper understanding of the agency's formulation and execution of basic policies, decisions, actions, or responsibilities.

(d) Record status of copies. The determination as to whether a particular document is a record does not depend upon whether it contains unique information. Multiple copies of the same document and documents containing duplicative information may each have record status depending on how they are used in conducting agency business.

§ 1222.14 What are nonrecord materials?

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Nonrecord materials are U.S. Government-owned documentary materials that do not meet the conditions of records status (see §1222.12(b)) or that are specifically excluded from the statutory definition of records (see 44 U.S.C. 3301). An agency's records management program also needs to include managing nonrecord materials. There are three specific categories of materials excluded from the statutory definition of records:

(a) Library and museum material (but only if such material is made or acquired and preserved solely for reference or exhibition purposes), including physical exhibits, artifacts, and other material objects lacking evidential value.

(b) Extra copies of documents (but only if the sole reason such copies are preserved is for convenience of reference).

(c) Stocks of publications and of processed documents. Catalogs, trade journals, and other publications that are received from other Government agencies, commercial firms, or private institutions and that require no action and are not part of a case on which action is taken. (Stocks do not include serial or record sets of agency publications and processed documents, including annual reports, brochures, pamphlets, books, handbooks, posters and maps.)

§ 1222.16 How are nonrecord materials managed?

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(a) Agencies must develop recordkeeping requirements to distinguish records from nonrecord materials.

(b) The following guidelines should be used in managing nonrecord materials:

(1) If a clear determination cannot be made, the materials should be treated as records. Agencies may consult with NARA for guidance.

(2) Nonrecord materials must be physically segregated from records or, for electronic non-record materials, readily identified and segregable from records;

(3) Nonrecord materials should be purged when no longer needed for reference. NARA's approval is not required to destroy such materials.

§ 1222.18 Under what conditions may nonrecord materials be removed from Government agencies?

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(a) Nonrecord materials, including extra copies of unclassified or formally declassified agency records kept only for convenience of reference, may be removed by departing employees from Government agency custody only with the approval of the head of the agency or the individual(s) authorized to act for the agency on records issues.

(b) National security classified information may not be removed from Government custody, except for a removal of custody taken in accordance with the requirements of the National Industrial Security Program established under Executive Order 12829, as amended, or a successor Order.

(c) Information which is restricted from release under the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), as amended, or other statutes may not be removed from Government custody except as permitted under those statutes.

(d) This section does not apply to use of records and nonrecord materials in the course of conducting official agency business, including telework and authorized dissemination of information.

§ 1222.20 How are personal files defined and managed?

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(a) Personal files are defined in §1220.18 of this subchapter. This section does not apply to agencies and positions that are covered by the Presidential Records Act of 1978 (44 U.S.C. 2201–2207) (see 36 CFR part 1270 of this chapter).

(b) Personal files must be clearly designated as such and must be maintained separately from the office's official records.

(1) Information about private (non-agency) matters and agency business must not be mixed in outgoing agency documents, such as correspondence and messages.

(2) If information about private matters and agency business appears in a received document, the document is a Federal record. Agencies may make a copy of the document with the personal information deleted or redacted, and treat the copy as the Federal record.

(3) Materials labeled “personal,” “confidential,” or “private,” or similarly designated, and used in the transaction of public business, are Federal records. The use of a label such as “personal” does not affect the status of documentary materials in a Federal agency.

Subpart B—Agency Recordkeeping Requirements

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§ 1222.22 What records are required to provide for adequate documentation of agency business?

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To meet their obligation for adequate and proper documentation, agencies must prescribe the creation and maintenance of records that:

(a) Document the persons, places, things, or matters dealt with by the agency.

(b) Facilitate action by agency officials and their successors in office.

(c) Make possible a proper scrutiny by the Congress or other duly authorized agencies of the Government.

(d) Protect the financial, legal, and other rights of the Government and of persons directly affected by the Government's actions.

(e) Document the formulation and execution of basic policies and decisions and the taking of necessary actions, including all substantive decisions and commitments reached orally (person-to-person, by telecommunications, or in conference) or electronically.

(f) Document important board, committee, or staff meetings.

§ 1222.24 How do agencies establish recordkeeping requirements?

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(a) Agencies must ensure that procedures, directives and other issuances; systems planning and development documentation; and other relevant records include recordkeeping requirements for records in all media, including those records created or received on electronic mail systems. Recordkeeping requirements must:

(1) Identify and prescribe specific categories of records to be systematically created or received and maintained by agency personnel in the course of their official duties;

(2) Specify the use of materials and recording techniques that ensure the preservation of records as long as they are needed by the Government;

(3) Specify the manner in which these materials must be maintained wherever held;

(4) Propose how long records must be maintained for agency business through the scheduling process in part 1225 of this subchapter;

(5) Distinguish records from nonrecord materials and comply with the provisions in Subchapter B concerning records scheduling and disposition;

(6) Include procedures to ensure that departing officials and employees do not remove Federal records from agency custody and remove nonrecord materials only in accordance with §1222.18;

(7) Define the special recordkeeping responsibilities of program managers, information technology staff, systems administrators, and the general recordkeeping responsibilities of all agency employees.

(b) Agencies must provide the training described in §1220.34(f) of this subchapter and inform all employees that they are responsible and accountable for keeping accurate and complete records of their activities.

§ 1222.26 What are the general recordkeeping requirements for agency programs?

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To ensure the adequate and proper documentation of agency programs, each program must develop recordkeeping requirements that identify:

(a) The record series and systems that must be created and maintained to document program policies, procedures, functions, activities, and transactions;

(b) The office responsible for maintaining the record copies of those series and systems, and the applicable system administrator responsible for ensuring authenticity, protection, and ready retrieval of electronic records;

(c) Related records series and systems;

(d) The relationship between paper and electronic files in the same series; and

(e) Policies, procedures, and strategies for ensuring that records are retained long enough to meet programmatic, administrative, fiscal, legal, and historical needs as authorized in a NARA-approved disposition schedule.

§ 1222.28 What are the series level recordkeeping requirements?

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To ensure that record series and systems adequately document agency policies, transactions, and activities, each program must develop recordkeeping requirements for records series and systems that include:

(a) Identification of information and documentation that must be included in the series and/or system;

(b) Arrangement of each series and the records within the series and/or system;

(c) Identification of the location of the records and the staff responsible for maintaining the records;

(d) Policies and procedures for maintaining the documentation of phone calls, meetings, instant messages, and electronic mail exchanges that include substantive information about agency policies and activities;

(e) Policies and procedures for identifying working files and for determining the record status of working files in paper and electronic form; and

(f) Policies and procedures for maintaining series consisting of different media.

§ 1222.30 When must agencies comply with the recordkeeping requirements of other agencies?

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Agencies must comply with recordkeeping requirements that are imposed government-wide by another agency with jurisdiction over the program or activity being conducted, e.g., requirements for records concerning hazardous waste. Affected agencies must include these requirements in appropriate directives or other official issuances prescribing the agency's organization, functions, or activities.

§ 1222.32 How do agencies manage records created or received by contractors?

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(a) Agency officials responsible for administering contracts must safeguard records created, processed, or in the possession of a contractor or a non-Federal entity by taking the following steps:

(1) Agencies must ensure that contractors performing Federal government agency functions create and maintain records that document these activities. Agencies must specify in the contract Government ownership and the delivery to the Government of all records necessary for the adequate and proper documentation of contractor-operated agency activities and programs in accordance with requirements of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act of 1974 (Pub. L. 93–400), as amended by Pub. L. 96–83 41 U.S.C.), and, where applicable, the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) (48 CFR parts 200–299).

(2) Records management oversight of contract records is necessary to ensure that all recordkeeping needs are met. All records created for Government use and delivered to, or under the legal control of, the Government must be managed in accordance with Federal law. In addition, electronic records and background electronic data specified for delivery to the contracting agency must be accompanied by sufficient technical documentation to permit understanding and use of the records and data.

(3) Contracts that require the creation of data for the Government's use must specify, in addition to the final product, delivery of background supporting data or other records that may have reuse value to the Government. To determine what background supporting data or other records that contractors must deliver, program and contracting officials must consult with agency records and information managers and historians and, when appropriate, with other Government agencies to ensure that all Government needs are met, especially when the data deliverables support a new agency mission or a new Government program.

(4) Deferred ordering and delivery-of-data clauses and rights-in-data clauses must be included in contracts whenever necessary to ensure adequate and proper documentation or because the data have reuse value to the Government.

(b) All data created for Government use and delivered to, or falling under the legal control of, the Government are Federal records subject to the provisions of 44 U.S.C. chapters 21, 29, 31, and 33, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), as amended, and the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), as amended, and must be managed and scheduled for disposition only as provided in Subchapter B.

(c) Agencies must ensure that appropriate authority for retention of classified materials has been granted to contractors or non-Government entities participating in the National Industrial Security Program (NISP), established under Executive order 12829, as amended, or a successor Order.

§ 1222.34 How must agencies maintain records?

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Agencies must implement a records maintenance program so that complete records are filed or otherwise identified and preserved, records can be readily found when needed, and permanent and temporary records are physically segregated from each other or, for electronic records, segregable. Agency records maintenance programs must:

(a) Institute procedures for organizing and storing records;

(b) Maintain electronic, audiovisual and cartographic, and microform records in accordance with 36 CFR parts 1236, 1237, and 1238 of this subchapter, respectively;

(c) Assign responsibilities for maintenance of records in all formats within each agency component, including designation of the officials that are responsible for maintenance and disposition of electronic records and management of automated systems used for recordkeeping;

(d) Institute reference and retrieval procedures and controls that:

(1) Facilitate the finding, charging out, and refiling of records, including safeguards against loss during transit; and

(2) Ensure that access to electronic records minimizes the risk of unauthorized additions, deletions, or alterations;

(e) Issue appropriate instructions to all agency employees on handling and protecting records;

(f) Maintain records and nonrecord materials separately, in accordance with §1222.16;

(g) Maintain personal files separately from records in accordance with §1222.20; and

(h) Comply with 36 CFR parts 1232 and 1234 of this subchapter when storing records in a records facility.
Electronic Code of Federal Regulations:

The Men and No Women of Web 2.0 Boards (BoomTown's Talking to You: Twitter, Facebook, Zynga, Groupon and Foursquare) Video

The Men and No Women of Web 2.0 Boards (BoomTown's Talking to You: Twitter, Facebook, Zynga, Groupon and Foursquare) Video

Friday, December 17, 2010

MoReq2010

BRINGING FORESIGHT AND VISION
TO INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
HARD FACTS ABOUT MOREQ2010
AN INFORESIGHT PAPER
If you have an interest in electronic records management, you need to be fully up to date
about the MoReq2010 consultation process – and you should take part in it. The
consultation is due to be open until 26 December 2010, so don’t lose any time. The
consultation draft of MoReq2010 is long and complex. In my view it goes much further than
the expected refactoring and simplification of MoReq2; instead, it is a radically new
specification that relies on many new ideas, some of which are complex. Here are a few
facts about it, in the hope that they will inform your review.
WHAT’S GOING ON?
◢ A draft of part of MoReq2010 is in consultation at the moment. Your comments as part
of the consultation will be very welcome. To comment, go to
http://contribute2moreq.eu.
◢ The consultation is due to finish on 26 December 2010.
◢ The part that is in consultation is intended to represent the “core” minimum workable
specification for electronic records management. It is referred to as version 0.92 of
MoReq2010.
◢ Additional parts called “extension modules” are expected in 2011. A timetable for their
consultation and finalisation is promised for 17 December 2010.
◢ The test framework is missing from the current draft. This is unfortunate, as experience
shows that developing detailed test conditions tends to uncover problems in the
requirements. A timetable for test framework consultation and finalisation is also
promised for 17 December.
◢ The xml schema is missing from the current draft. A timetable for xml schema
consultation and finalisation is also promised for 17 December.
WHAT ABOUT THE CONTENT?
◢ The draft contains a minimum of 475 mandatory requirements. This is more than the
core of MoReq2, which includes 466 requirements.
◢ The minimum workable specification consists of all the requirements in sections 1.5 to
1.15 plus the requirements in module 101 or 102 plus the requirements in module 201

Inforesight Limited is registered in England and Wales as company number 6798015 2.

or 202 plus the requirements in module 301 or 302. Many implementations will require
both modules 301 and 302. Further “extension” modules are due to be developed in
2011 and subsequent years.
◢ The draft takes records management further than MoReq2, for example allowing for
manage-in-place architectures, API-only interfaces, and (importantly) the separation of
classification from aggregations.
◢ The language of the draft is more rigorous than the language in MoReq2. The draft is
developed using well-articulated principles and structures that contribute to its rigour
(though much of the basis for its rigour, namely the links between functions,
requirements and metadata elements, is not visible in this draft and so has to be taken
on trust).
◢ The draft relies on several new concepts which are novel to many practitioners. For
example, the absence of audit trails, the way “alerts” are defined and handled, “export
headers”, “generations” and heavy reliance on UUIDs to name a few. These concepts
are open to consultation once only, until 26 December 2010.
◢ MoReq2010 in effect defines a new way to describe and store electronic records and
their metadata, and implicitly it calls for this new way to be adopted for the indefinite
future. This concept is open to consultation once only, until 26 December 2010.
◢ There are no “optional” or non-mandatory requirements in this draft of MoReq2010.
◢ 48 “non-functional requirements” are included in the draft (they are worded as open
questions rather than requirements). There are no requirements for “ease of use”.
◢ The draft is not fully compatible with MoReq2. It contains some features which are
contrary to MoReq2 requirements.
◢ The draft omits several features of great importance to some users, such as interfaces
with email, office systems and scanning subsystems. These may follow in extension
modules.
WHAT ABOUT THE TIMING?
◢ The consultation period is due to close on 26 December 2010.
◢ Publication of the final version of the core is promised for 31 December 2010.
◢ The original plan allowed for two months between end of this consultation and
publication of the final specification. The two months were to allow for revision, review
by the Editorial Board, independent QA, and approval by the DLM Executive Committee.
The planned two months is now reduced The current plan collapses this two month
period into five days between Christmas and the New Year. It is difficult to see how
revision, reviews by the Editorial Board and Executive Committee plus independent QA
can be fitted into this period if the consultation is taken seriously.

Inforesight Limited is registered in England and Wales as company number 6798015 3.

WHAT NEXT?
◢ Go to the consultation site – http://contribute2moreq.eu – to comment.
◢ The consultation site requires registration, and is fairly easy to use.
◢ The draft is available in two forms: as 100 separate web pages, each of which has to be
commented on separately; and as a single 206-page PDF which is not searchable.
Comments have to be submitted using the 100 web pages.

Marc Fresko
Inforesight Limited, 13 December 2010

Federal News Radio 1500 AM: NARA to suspend development of ERA starting in 2012

Federal News Radio 1500 AM: NARA to suspend development of ERA starting in 2012

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

How to maximize free space on the BlackBerry Smartphone



UV Cell Phone Sanitizer made by VioLight Video Overview



Important Facts About Electronic Document Management Systems

Important Facts About Electronic Document Management Systems

Friday, December 10, 2010

Record Management System ebook download in PDF format

Record Management System ebook download in PDF format

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Sarbanes-Oxley: Impacting the Records Management Industry

Fireproof Records Center Blog » Blog Archive » Sarbanes-Oxley: Impacting the Records Management Industry

Saturday, December 4, 2010

How to Improve Your Ability to Learn Quickly - wikiHow

I like this article. It is short, precise and very basic.

How to Improve Your Ability to Learn Quickly - wikiHow

Friday, December 3, 2010

Records Management Certification Overview and Outline

Records Management Certification Overview and Outline


Every organization and every individual has records! Business offices, government agencies, non-profit groups, educational institutions, and medical facilities-just to name a few-must deal with enormous amounts of records on a daily basis. Executives and support staff are inundated with data and information in various formats.

A record is anything that provides information. A record may be on any type of media: paper or electronic, digital or analog, magnetic or optical, liquid or solid…. In today's technological environment, organizations must learn how to handle these records so that they can be used as needed in the future. Records must be managed from the time they are created or received, through distribution, use, and maintenance, until they are finally destroyed or permanently archived.

This Records Management course will give a basic overview of records management terminology, concepts, and procedures to successfully manage records in today's offices. Regardless of the media on which the record is stored, the record must be properly managed to be an asset to the organization. Another important component of a professional records management program is legality issues. A comprehensive, legally-sound records retention schedule must be developed and strictly followed so that the company is not held liable for problems that could have been avoided in the first place.

Should records be stored on paper, in an electronic format, in a microform? How is a Records Inventory conducted? What are the steps in the development of a company-wide Records Retention Schedule? How are records archived? This course will assist you in making those decisions based upon certain characteristics of the records. Also, the rules established by the Association of Records Managers and Administrators (ARMA) will be used for the proper coding and filing of records.

Each section of this online course contains learning objectives, review questions, practical applications, and assignment activities for the student to study for mastery of content.

This course will provide an introduction to the profession of records and information management. It focuses on development of knowledge necessary to establish and manage successful organization-wide records management programs. This course will encompass the tried-and-proved "winning strategies for successful records management programs."

Upon registering, you are given an initial six months to complete the program. Should you need more time, you may request a 6-month extension at no additional charge.

Course Objectives

Define records management and describe the importance of managing document-based information systems in business and government.

Describe the business justification for records management and list the major components of a formally established records management program.

Identify the distinguishing differences among the major methods used in inventorying the records of an organization.

Delineate the different methods used in inventorying electronic record media.

Explain the business and legal benefits of establishing a records retention program.

Describe the steps involved in planning and developing a records retention program.

Discuss the legal issues of records retention program development.

Explain how to conduct and document legal research on federal, state, and local records retention requirements.

Describe the theory and practice of records retention decision-making.

Explain the need for vital records protection and disaster recovery planning.

Describe how vital records are identified and how they differ from important and useful records.

Explain the concepts and techniques of protecting vital electronic records.

Identify guidelines for developing vital records operating procedures.

State the objectives of a filing system.

Explain the differences between direct and indirect access systems.

Identify the various types of coding systems.

Describe the functions of an index and identify general criteria for indexing systems.

Enumerate the arrangements, purposes, and characteristics of the different classification systems, i.e., subject, numeric, alphabetic, alphanumeric.

Identify factors that help reduce the area and time of a records search.

Explain the primary tools used for identifying records.

Recommend solutions for common filing problems and for safeguarding the security and confidentiality of records.

Describe the process for file reorganization.

Identify the reasons for careful selection of records housing equipment and describe the criteria and considerations in selecting equipment.

Explain principles for inventorying electronic records.

Describe and evaluate records management software and how it is used.

Describe bar code technology and its uses.

Explain the fundamentals of a microfilm system.

Explain the operation, components, and benefits of different types of cameras used for microfilming.

Discuss the purpose of various peripheral equipment, such as processors, duplicators, jacket and aperture card loaders, and readers and reader-printers.

Describe computer-assisted retrieval systems (CAR) and computer-output microfilm (COM).

List the purpose, advantages, capabilities, and major components of electronic imaging systems.

Explain the various types of optical disks and their characteristics.

Discuss how hybrid micrographic systems are complementing electronic imaging in enterprise-wide computer systems.

Identify the advantages and limitations of using micrographics or electronic imaging in the management of an organization's records.

Learn what information should be gathered and how to determine the economic and technical feasibility of using an imaging system in the management of records to enable the effective design of an appropriate system.

Explain the need and the objectives of an effective forms management program.

Identify the program elements of a forms management program.

Identify various types of paper-based and electronic forms.

Explain how to establish an effective forms analysis program.

Identify tools used in forms inventory and appraisal.

Identify the scope and functions of mail management programs.

Describe how automated mail handling equipment works.

List the types of electronic message transmission systems that are used in today's modern office.

Identify the scope of reprographics and copy control.

State the basic principles of an effective copy management program.

Explain how to conduct a reprographics management program evaluation.

State the purposes and advantages of records management manuals.

Explain the purposes and functions of a records center.

Establish criteria for planning the requirements for a records center facility, equipment, and layout.

Identify the different types of records storage space-numbering systems and explain the advantages of each.

Explain the advantages and disadvantages of a commercial records center as compared to an in-house facility.

Explain some commonly used records center search and charge-out procedures.

Outline policies and procedures for establishing a records disposal system for a records center.

Enumerate the duties and responsibilities of records center personnel.

Define archives management and explain the types and functions of archives.

Identify the criteria for appraising the value of archival records.

Describe the principles of conservation of archival materials to ensure their permanent preservation.


Document and Records Management Basics

Document & Records Management


A Records Management department is established to ensure compliance with the Federal Law and regulations relating to the preservation and destruction of information/ records created during the course of business.

Records Management is defined as " that field of management responsible for the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposition of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about the business activities and transactions in ther form of records" (ISO 15489)

The benefits of a Document and Records Management program are:

1. Timely retrieval of records when needed for both internal and external (such as OPRA) purposes.
2. Higher employee productivity
3. Reduced legal liability
4. Frees up valuable office space.
5. Protection of college history
6. Facilitates quick recovery of records in the event of a disaster.


The areas of responsibility of the Document and Records Management department include:

• Policy and Procedure Development
• Records Retention Schedules
• Inactive Records Storage
• Document Imaging Solutions
• Electronic Records Management
• Forms Design and Management

Taking out the eTrash!

Records Management Charlotte NC | Document Scanning, Storage, Shredding


Records Management Charlotte NC | Document Scanning, Storage, Shredding